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Outskirts of Narnia, days after Clemens' proclamation
 

For nearly three days Titus had walked along the Via Flaminia, moving steadily away from Rome. News of the Praetorian Clemens declaring himself Caesar had spread through the city like a wildfire, and Titus, being the man of action he was, could not simply stay home and wait for the traitor's thirsty supporters to knock on his door. No, his first course of action had been to entrust the safety of his wife and daughter to his older brother. Quintus had always been good with words, a proper diplomat, and he would no doubt find a way to send Valeria and little Flacca to stay with his own wife Cornelia, at a sufficient distance from Rome.

His second course of action had been to change to his most nondescript tunica and cloak - one grey, the other brown and both unremarkable in every way save for the quality of the fabric and the attention put into the seams -, tuck his trusty pugio into his belt and grab a good amount of coin. He'd need it for the long journey to Cappadocia, and a larger amount than under ordinary circumstances. Silence and safe passage would have to be bought at some point, and perhaps a horse if he was feeling bold enough.

Laurus, his faithful body slave, was ordered to stay behind despite hearty protests. The man was getting up in age and his eyesight had been failing for some time, and Titus feared the slave would simply be too recognisable. Instead, Laurus was to stay and protect the house from looting and thieves, and the teenage son of the cook was to accompany Titus on his way to Quintus Alexander's legions. They would pretend to be a slave trader and his servant, making for Dacia to secure a new batch of conquered hands to sell in Rome.

It was a good plan at its inception, or so Titus thought. They would exit the capital from the north so as not to arouse suspicion; Clemens and his men would definitely expect the high-ranking class to take the Via Appia to the south, whether to seek refuge in their villae or to board a ship headed eastward, or attempt to escape via the port of Ostia. Taking the Via Flaminia toward the north-east through the mountains did not seem plausible enough to Clemens as a means of exiting Rome, as he did not seem to have increased his men's monitoring of it.

The first day had gone well. They had made good headway after leaving the city at nightfall, and the boy slave was quite adept at lighting a fire when Titus decided they had come far enough to get some rest. Too bad the boy had been gone by dawn, the dimension of his task too much for a boy of 13 who had never been out of the city previously. It was a minor setback, but the slave's presence had been far from crucial. Titus could start a fire easily too, and only having himself to worry about should there be a fight certainly made things easier. Sleep would have to be visited in short light bursts, but that was nothing his service hadn't trained him for.

The last milestone he had passed told him he was only three miles away from Narnia. Once there, he would have to opt to continue following the same road or making a detour through the Via Flaminia Nova, but given the lack of trouble thus far, Titus was inclined to stay on the main road. He was yet undecided as to his final destination on mainland Italia: Ancona had a more geographically favoured position, but the port of Ariminum was busier and more developed. From one of these cities Titus intended to cross the Adriatic to either Salona or Dyrrachium, and then make his way overland to Cappadocia. Another option was to sail to Tarsus in Cilicia and then cross the mountains to Caesarea, but Titus was not a fan of ships and preferred to stay on firm ground as much as possible. His stomach would thank him for it.

Despite the short distance left, Titus' feet were clamouring for some rest. The prickling of thirst in his throat was getting harder to ignore, too, and so he decided to make a quick stop. Just a couple of passi off the road was a great oak, and Titus wasted no time in accepting its silent invitation and nestling down between two big roots, back leaning against the trunk. He emptied his water skin and wiped off a few errant droplets with the back of his hand. There was no longer any bread left, but he could resupply in Narnia, perhaps buy some smoked sausage and dates too. And a horse, because at this rate - even at his good marching pace - it was going to take far too long to reach Quintus Alexander.

Over on the road a cart plodded along; even from this distance Titus could see the driver's fabulous red moustache, and immediately pegged him for a Gaul. Not far behind, two men followed the same path. There was nothing particularly eye-catching about them, but the older one's countenance seemed  familiar. Titus squinted. It might not be wise to rise and approach them out of the blue just to get a better look; they might think him a thief or a roadside bandit.  If only the oak had been a little closer to the road...

 

@Chevi @Sharpie

Edited by Liv
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By this point, Aulus was more inclined to go to Ariminium, though he suspected that might be guarded too. It could not be watched as closely as Ostia, though; anyone wanting to get anywhere across the sea would go to Ostia (and walk into a trap, Aulus was convinced of it). Was he walking into a trap himself? Right now, he had no idea.

The pace was easy (no need to wear himself - or Felix - out by forcing the Legion's vaunted twenty-five miles a day, even though everything inside was screaming at him to do just that). It would not get them to their destination any quicker - well, it might, but an hour or two would make little difference when it came to actually getting to sea. Anyway, an easy pace was far less likely to draw attention than if they were marching like soldiers, in their rough tunics and cloaks.

"I think we'll take a rest," he told Felix, indicating the oak that stood far enough off the road to allow travellers to rest without risk of having dust kicked over them by ever passerby.

 

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The past two days had been fairly uneventful for a daring escape. They were far from being out of danger, but for now, there were no immediate signs of it. Felix kept his eyes open and his ears sharp, but as the hours wore on, the road became a new normal, and the constant walking at a stead (but not forced) pace was not all that different from the monotony of other jobs he had done as a slave. They walked, they kept their heads down, they rationed their food, and they talked a little when Aulus felt like talking. Other than that, an escape from execution and a journey to the countryside seemed to have a lot in common. 

"I think we'll take a rest," Aulus decided. Felix followed his gaze to the oak tree off the road. It seemed like a good place to stop, away from the dust of the road. Felix nodded, heading to the tree to take a closer look; some of these trees along the road were altars or shrines, and occasionally, closer to cities, they had graves nearby.

This one had a person already occupying the shade.

Felix paused, not sure if he should approach the stranger, who was dressed in nondescript clothing, but also not sure if walking away would arouse suspicion about their intentions. He waited for Aulus to catch up, and decide if he was willing to share the resting spot...

@Liv @Sharpie

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One of the men pointed to the oak, but the other seemed to hesitate. They'd probably had the same idea as Titus, and the fact that they wanted to take a break so close to the city had to mean they had been walking for a while, perhaps even the whole day. He understood why they were reluctant to approach; one never knew if fellow travellers could be trusted, and there was no shortage of gruesome stories about robbery and assault.

A friendly gesture would have been to share food and drink with the pair, but he was all out of both. Of course, there was the small chance that they weren't friendly at all, but for the time being they seemed to be more wary of Titus than he of them. Besides, he still had that nagging impression that he had seen the oldest's countenance before.

He made a decision. Titus rose slowly as not to alarm them and lifted his hands with palms facing the strangers; at the same time, his elbow pushed the cloak away to the side so the pugio was visible - a silent message that in spite of meaning no harm, he was neither harmless nor unarmed. A cautious smile played on his lips. 

"No need to be suspicious, citizens. This oak is large enough for the three of us to sit under." One, two, three careful steps away from the tree and closer to the men. Close enough to see their features now. The younger man was a complete stranger, although his simple appearance belied a strong complexion. A quick examination of the older man, however, made Titus' eyes light up in recognition. "Sir... are you, per chance, Aulus Calpurnius Praetextatus, former tribune?"

If his guess were confirmed, Titus imagined he would feel very much like a glutton presented with a bowl of globi -or, in parlance of two millennia years later, like a child who'd seen Santa Claus.

 

@Chevi @Sharpie

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Dammit. There was someone already there, and Aulus very nearly changed his mind, except that doing so would look odd if they'd already been spotted. And he had his pugio (he would have liked to have brought his gladius, except that there would have been no way at all to conceal that from the Praetorians at the gate.

They'd been spotted (well, duh!) and the resting man stood to greet them. He blinked at the sound of his name, instantly growing suspicious - if there was one of the enemy out here, there would surely be others, and he wouldn't be able to defend himself (and Felix) for very long from properly armed and trained Praetorians or legionaries.

Except the other man had moved his cloak aside to show his own pugio, and Aulus could see that there was no armour nor shield nor helmet.

"Titus Sulpicius Rufus?" he asked, as the other shifted so that Aulus could see him better. "Jupiter be praised, I thought I was the only one to get away."

But why was he alone? Was Aulus walking into a trap - but then, if he was not, Titus could easily think that he was. Too much suspicion could easily do Clemens' job for him.

"This is Felix, my body-slave. We got out last night," he said, very aware that he was breaking all the social rules he'd ever learned by introducing his slave, but desperate times, desperate measures and all that - and there was no need to keep Titus feeling suspicious if he could allay that just by saying that his companion was his slave.

Well, allay those suspicions to some degree, at least.

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The man was friendly, but armed. Felix kept an eye on the pugio on his belt as he got up and walked closer, leaving the shade of the tree. Two men could take one, but not without a fight, and there might be more hiding. Wasn't that what bandits did?

"No need to be suspicious, citizens. This oak is large enough for the three of us to sit under."

Felix shot a glance at Aulus. The decision was his, even if they were traveling under the guise of equal companions. Before his master could respond, however, there was a look of recognition on the other man's face.

"Sir... are you, per chance, Aulus Calpurnius Praetextatus, former tribune?"

Felix' hand wandered to his belt. All he had was a knife, but if they were recognized by someone hostile, maybe someone looking for escaped noblemen, then he would have to do his best to keep his master from getting captured.

"Titus Sulpicius Rufus? Jupiter be praised, I thought I was the only one to get away."

Felix glanced at Aulus again. The two men knew each other, but the other traveler, Titus Sulpicius Rufus, was alone, with no companion in sight. Were they gone, or were they hiding?

"This is Felix, my body-slave. We got out last night,"

"Salve, domine" Felix nodded at the other man, momentarily forgetting the promise he'd made to Aulus about using titles. He had been named as a slave anyway. He just wasn't sure how to act like one, now that he had been introduced. Especially if he'd end up having to wrestle the man anyway. "I trust your journey was safe so far?"

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Titus expressed his delight at being recognised by flashing a toothy grin. "The very same," he confirmed. How kind of the gods to have Aulus' path cross with his own. The man had left a powerful impression on Titus some years prior, when they had both been stationed in Gallia, and would undoubtedly be a valuable ally on the way to the East.

"I was lucky to hear of the news in time. It would've been madness to try and head south, with Clemens' cronies out for blood." He spit on the ground with contempt.  That same gesture would have been an unforgivable provocation in Rome, but here and now, between like-minded people, it illustrated just how little Titus thought of the usurper and his friends.

So the sturdy-looking man was Aulus' slave. Social conventions be damned, it was useful to know the slave was loyal to his master - which was more than could be said of Titus' quick-legged erstwhile servant. He nodded back his acknowledgment at Felix, figuring he owed the two men an explanation as to why he was alone. 

"It has, haven't run into any trouble yet. Well, aside from my slave abandoning his duty already on the first night," he scowled. Hadn't it been for time being of the essence, Titus would have looked for the boy and shown him just how they handled deserters in the army, but that would be a matter for another time. "But I had to move on, and here I am. On the positive side, it's faster to travel alone." It was meagre consolation, but Titus was not one to dwell on what could have been; he preferred to direct his energies toward what actually could be done and put it into practice.

"Are you also headed to Ariminum? Or Ancona, perhaps?" 

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Posted (edited)

"Everyone and their grandmother will be heading south, if they got out of the city," Aulus said. "I can't think that any of Quintus' people will make it if they try that route, and Ostia is sure to be under close watch. It made more sense to try for a northward exit - quicker too, in the long run, when trying to get to the east."

So his friend's slave had deserted him. Aulus was a little surprised - pleased, but surprised - that Felix hadn't also decidetthat his best chance of freedom was to abscond in the night. Giving him the chance to do so, or to prove his loyalty, was one reason Aulus hadn't put up much of an argument over going to sleep in those first few hours on the road.

"I was thinking Ariminum," he said candidly. "Ancona is as good, though further to go, and the one is as likely to be watched as the other. Either will save time that would be wasted sailing from anywhere along the west coast, though."

He moved into the shade of the tree. "Where were you thinking of heading for, then?"

Presumably, they were both aiming to join up with Quintus, though neither of them had anything much other than the clothes on their backs. And the intelligence they carried in their heads on Clemens' plans and what he had done - was doing - to Quintus' family and friends.

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The spitting made it abundantly clear that this man had no love lost for Clemens either. Another refugee then, on his way to the nearest safe port to sail... somewhere. Felix stepped back, letting the noblemen talk as he kept an eye on the road. They had information to exchange and acquaintances to make, and he was not exactly needed for any of that conversation.

"It has, haven't run into any trouble yet. Well, aside from my slave abandoning his duty already on the first night,"

Felix made a small frown. The other slave had done the thing he had considered and rejected: they bolted for freedom, leaving their distressed master behind. Felix wondered how far they would make it on their own. He could understand the wish for freedom, but there was no honor in running away from someone who needed help, and there was no free life without honor anyway. At least that was how Felix thought about it.

Being in the company of two noblemen instead of just Aulus brought a shift in his status again. With the two of them finding each other's company, Felix was once again invisible in the background. Not a sole traveling companion, just the body slave that did not run away.

Not that it bothered him all that much.

@Liv  

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Titus was happy to notice he and Aulus shared a common reasoning; he often feared he acted too quickly, too rashly, and to have someone he saw as calm and pondered come to the same conclusions boosted his self-confidence significantly. He followed Aulus to the shade of the oak and motioned for the two men to sit down like he had been doing up until a few moments. A party of three travellers taking a break under a tree and chatting would attract less attention than if they were to keep standing by the roadside.

"I'm thinking of going to Ariminum. The harbour there is bigger and busier than Ancona's, so there must be more ships headed to Illyricum." There should also be better, more stable ships that would traverse the sea more quickly; if fishing boats were the only option, Titus was not sure he wouldn't turn back and ride on horseback across Histria and Dalmatia in order to keep his stomach inside his body. If the gods had intended for men to spend a big part of his life in water, they would have given them gills and fins - yet they hadn't, and Titus did not fancy testing their patience.

"Getting to Salona or Dyrrachium is my short-term goal. I'll probably just embark on whatever ship leaves first." From there on out, his plan was blurrier and the path less clear, but he was sure of one thing - maritime travel was only an option when choosing land over it would result in extreme delays. "What is your plan?" If Aulus had a better idea - which may very well be the case, as he had more experience -, then Titus was all ears.

The body slave had been quiet and withdrawn from conversation, and Titus wondered if he had sufficient notions of geography to know what they were discussing. He had shown himself to be loyal to his master, but was he educated? Time to find out. "Felix, wasn't it?" he asked, turning his head to face the slave. "How familiar are you with the Eastern provinces?"

 

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Posted (edited)

Aulus indicated that Felix should sit, too; there was no point in having him worn out just because he had a thoughtless master. Anyway, appearances and social customs be damned when he was in as much danger as Aulus and Titus, just because Aulus had dragged him out into all this.

He grabbed a twig and sketched in the dirt a decent approximation of Italia's boot shape and the coast of the Mediterranean as far as Syria, and added in the towns as he named them. "I plan to get as far as Tarsus by ship - there must be something going more or less directly there from Ariminum - and then overland up to Cappadocia. Two weeks' walking, two, maybe three weeks' sailing and another week or so to Caesarea - and let's hope he's there, or we can get news of him there. Sea travel is quicker than overland, I think."

Unless they were extremely unlucky, anyway.

He grinned across at Felix, encouraging him to join in with the conversation - yes, it might be odd to include a slave, but the whole situation was odd to begin with, and he'd rather have a slave who could, and would, speak up when allowed to.

 

@Chevi @Liv

 

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It was clear that they were all heading in the same direction, with the same ultimate goal in mind. Felix felt a small flash of pride about having thoughtof leaving the city through the Flaminia gate. But now that they were out here, the flight was far from over. 

Their new acquaintance was heading to the port of Ariminum as well, but beyond that, there were many ships, and many roads to take. No one could have blamed the fleeing men for simply trying to get as far away from Rome as possible... But Aulus, at least, had further plans. 

They were heading to the East. Over the sea and to where the rightful ruler of Rome resided. Aulus was going to take his chances taking a side in the looming fight. 

"Felix, wasn't it? How familiar are you with the Eastern provinces?"

"Not at all" Felix admitted simply, shaking his head "It was never my place to know."  

It was a fact, not an accusation. Slaves, especially household slaves, did not need to know such things. 

"My mother is Greek, but she did not tell le much about Achaea." 

@Liv @Sharpie

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Posted (edited)

Titus nodded in acknowledgement of the slave's admission of ignorance. "Fair enough." Indeed, not all of them had a need for education; not every tool needed to be sharp. Yet, Felix had just been presented with a quick lesson in Italian and Eastern geography, courtesy of his master. Aulus' sketch was a very reasonable likeness to the real world, the distance between towns even sufficiently proportional.

His enthusiasm waned somewhat as Aulus pointed out his intended stops. It was beginning to look like a long sea journey was inevitable, since it was the faster - and given the circumstances, preferred - option. "It often is, so long as Neptune is in a jolly mood." A storm could appear seemingly out of nowhere, and many a good ship and crew never made it to their destination. Overland, as far as Titus was concerned, was safer to a certain extent: inclement weather could be waited out someplace dry, it was easier to stay on course and resupply, and ambushing thieves were easier to escape or deal with. But... it would take longer, even with fresh horses at every stop. 

He exhaled deeply. "Your plan is sound. There should be ships going at least halfway there, to Corinthus or thereabouts." Titus turned to smile at Felix. "You would get to see your mother's homeland," he suggested with no scorn or malice in his voice. Had the slave ever wondered about it?

Directing his attention to Aulus once more, Titus figured it was time to come clean. Admitting weakness did not come easily to him, but he'd done less brave things. "You may have noticed my hesitation regarding sea travel..." He twiddled his thumbs, voice trailing off. "It's because I find it extremely unpleasant. It does not agree with my body."

There, he'd said it.

And prepared for the laughter he knew would ensue.

 

@Chevi @Sharpie

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It was a perfectly reasonable thing to admit to; Aulus was well aware of the effect sea-travel could have on even the most hardened of souls.

"I can't say that I know anybody who precisely relishes sea travel," he said with a shrug."But it's quicker and cheaper - and overall less dangerous - than trying to make the journey overland. On balance, I think the discomfort worth it - but you may not, and there's no shame in that."

Well, he wasn't going to shame anyone for finding that their stomach rebelled when they were standing on the deck of a ship out on the water, after all. He was not in command of Titus Sulpicius Rufus - was not in command of anyone save his own slave, who probably had never really seen the sea, let alone looked on it as a method of travel he might be expected to take.

He didn't feel all that comfortable himself on the deck of a ship, but travelling the Mare Nostrum had to beat travelling the far colder rougher waters that separated Gaul from Britannia.

He added Salona and Dyrrachium to his roughly sketched map. "It is entirely up to you which route you choose," he told Titus. "Tarsus is a port of some magnitude, at least, so it is possible that we are more likely to find a ship headed there than to many other ports, except perhaps Corinth, but that would mean a trip through Greece, which is more mountainous than many other places, or finding a second ship to head onwards."

He looked at he slave. "I was unaware your mother was from Achaea. Do you speak any Greek, at all?"

 

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"Your plan is sound. There should be ships going at least halfway there, to Corinthus or thereabouts... You would get to see your mother's homeland,"

Felix blinked. He had never thought about that way. Achaea seemed like something magical and far away, a land of few stories, a place that Romans loved to talk about but it didn't sound any more real than... any other place outside of Rome. And it was strange to imagine his mother anywhere else but the household kitchen.

Their new acquaintance seemed a little hesitant about the plan. Felix wondered what made him skittish, but the truth came out soon enough:

"You may have noticed my hesitation regarding sea travel... It's because I find it extremely unpleasant. It does not agree with my body."

"I can't say that I know anybody who precisely relishes sea travel. But it's quicker and cheaper - and overall less dangerous - than trying to make the journey overland. On balance, I think the discomfort worth it - but you may not, and there's no shame in that."

Felix had never been out on a ship before either. The conversation made him wonder about how he would handle the adventure. It would have been quite shameful to spend the journey horribly sick, while he was supposed to be looking out for his master...

Achaea seemed to be looming on their horizon as a possible stop on the journey. Felix had to admit that he was excited about the prospect.

"I was unaware your mother was from Achaea. Do you speak any Greek, at all?"

"Some." Felix nodded with a little hesitation "Not like... I can't converse about philosophy or anything, but yes, my mother talked to me in Greek."

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Surprisingly, neither  men made a fuss about his confession. Titus was counting on, at the very least, a raised eyebrow from Aulus Calpurnius Pratextatus - politeness, or pity, would suggest a gesture no more reproving than that - and the slave biting the inside of his cheek to keep himself from laughing... But instead, all he saw and heard was a shrug, a comment on the advantages of sea travel, and a slightly thoughtful, wondering look in the slave's eyes. Could Felix, too, be reluctant about travelling through Neptune's domain? Or was he perhaps picturing in his mind's eye already how Achaea was like?

He gazed at the crude map drawn in the dirt, pondering what to do while listening with only half an ear to the other two. Time was of the essence in this situation, and even if he were to ride day and night, and be so lucky as to find fresh horses at every outpost... No, who was he kidding? Only himself. With or without seasickness, the truth of the matter was that the sea route was a good ten days or so faster. Legions could be mobilised, and cities besieged and destroyed in ten days.  Titus pinched the bridge of his nose in defeat.

The others were talking. "I can't converse about philosophy or anything, but yes, my mother talked to me in Greek." Good, so Felix had some knowledge of it. Spared them from having to translate for him, though few would bother doing it for a slave. "Well, nobody really expects a slave to wax eloquent about philosophy in Greek, unless that's exactly what they were purchased for," Titus deadpanned, letting his irritation seep through. He almost regretted having come across the pair, for otherwise he could have carried on with his merry, time-wasting delusion of taking an overland route. His stomach would have appreciated that... but it was not meant to be.

He caught himself an instant later, though, and tried to smooth over any ruffled feathers. "It's definitely a plus that you speak it, though. One can never have too many eyes and ears in circumstances like this."

Titus made to stand up; his mind was finally made up, and the sooner they got on with it the sooner it would be over. "How often do you think ships depart for Corinthus or Tarsus from Ariminium?"

 

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Titus was not the first man Aulus had encountered who turned green at the prospect of venturing out on the sea. Neptune's kingdom was not a comfortable place to be for those whose expertise lay more with the Legions than merchants such as the Phoenicians who regularly plied their trade the length and breadth of the Mare Nostrum.

"Both Corinthus and Tarsus are major trading centres," he said, mostly for Felix's benefit. He marked a tiny cross on his sketched map to indicate Corinthus. "I don't think we will need to wait too long to find a ship heading east once we reach Ariminium."

Quite how comfortable that ship would be remained to be seen, of course.

Having a slave who had even a rudimentary knowledge of Greek must surely be helpful, especially in the east where everyone spoke Greek rather than Latin - to a greater or lesser degree, anyway.

He caught the slight flash of irritation that crossed the other citizen's face but it lasted a mere heartbeat.

"I think it is well to plan ahead, but not too rigidly," he said. "Even the best plans can be thrown into confusion by unforeseen circumstances. Gods willing, everything goes right."

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 "Well, nobody really expects a slave to wax eloquent about philosophy in Greek, unless that's exactly what they were purchased for,"

The comment came out more than a little short, and Felix dipped his head in a nod, the way he used to do in the household when someone snapped an order at him. Why did he feel like the words stung now? He had never thought they were anything out of the ordinary before. People made comments like that, and much worse, about slaves all the time.

Titus seemed to catch himself a moment later.

"It's definitely a plus that you speak it, though. One can never have too many eyes and ears in circumstances like this."

"I will do my best, dominus." Felix nodded again. The rest of the plan was not up to his decision, or even opinion. That had been made clear.

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